Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

haine

  • Paris Butcher Offers Lesson in Interfaith Ties

    Jean Aboucaya ponders over slabs of meat, laid out temptingly behind a wide counter.  The French Algerian has driven across Paris to shop with the guarantee his purchases meet Jewish dietary laws.

    “I’ve been coming here for years,” he says of the Boucherie de l’Argonne, located in the city’s northeastern 19th arrondissement.  “This is the best butcher in town.”

    It’s Friday morning.  In about an hour, the store will be shuttered.  Muslim employees will head to afternoon prayers.  The Jewish ones will prepare for Shabbat.

    “We work well together,” says Philippe Zribi, a Tunisian-born Jew whose family runs the shop.  Nodding towards his staff, mostly Muslims who, like himself, hail from North Africa, he adds, “We have a lot more in common than with other foreigners.”

    In a city still recovering from last year’s deadly Islamist attacks, and with news regularly peppered with reports of anti-Semitism, this kosher butcher under an abandoned railroad track offers a more positive face of interfaith relations.

    It also reflects the melting pot that defines the 19th arrondissement, where 200,000 residents represent no less than 120 nationalities.

    Jews, Muslims co-exist

    With an estimated 30,000-40,000 Jews living in the 19th, the district represents the largest Jewish population of any western European neighborhood, according to local Deputy Mayor Mahor Chiche.  It also hosts a sizeable Muslim population that mostly hails from North and sub-Saharan Africa.

    “There’s a real mix, both socially and religiously,” says Chiche, who is in charge of community relations in the 19th.

    Butcher Abdel Haq takes a question from a customer at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. ( L. Bryant/VOA)
    Butcher Abdel Haq takes a question from a customer at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. ( L. Bryant/VOA)

    “The older generation, who lived together in Algeria, Tunisia or Morocco, they know each other.  They speak Arabic, Hebrew and French, but the younger generation has a harder time getting to know each other.  More work needs to be done there.”

    Across the country, anti-Muslim acts tripled last year to nearly 400, according to France’s Interior Ministry.  Muslim associations say many more were not reported.  Anti-Jewish acts were double that number in 2015, although they were down slightly from the year before.

    “The first targets are synagogues and Jewish schools and centers,” says Sammy Ghozlan, who heads the National Bureau of Vigilance Against Anti-Semitism, a watchdog group.  “Now, with the army guarding them, of course there will be fewer attacks.”

    While official reports don’t mention the origins of the perpetrators, Ghozlan and many other Jews blame young, disaffected Muslims and, to a lesser degree, the far-right.

    Blaming community outsiders

    A new and unusually frank survey by the private IPSOS polling agency finds more than two-thirds of French Jews believe anti-Semitism has greatly increased during the past five years.  More than one-quarter of all French respondents said they had personally encountered insults and other problems with Muslims during the past year, according to the report commissioned by the French Judaism Foundation and published in a French newspaper Sunday.

    About 13 percent of respondents said there were too many Jews in the country, rising to 18 percent among Muslim respondents.

    Philippe Zribi (L) is seen with employees at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. (L. Bryant/VOA)
    Philippe Zribi (L) is seen with employees at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. (L. Bryant/VOA)


    But Deputy Mayor Chiche says Jewish-Muslim tensions have abated in recent years.  “In 2000, we had big incidents, like attacks on restaurants,” he says.  “Today, anti-Semitism exists, but you can walk around with a kippa [yarmulke] in the 19th without a problem.”

    French sociologist Michel Wieviorka says terrorist attacks have led to greater understanding among Jewish and Muslim communities.  

    “The real violence doesn’t come from the communities as such, but by individuals who are not part of their communities,” he says.

    A prominent French rabbi, Michel Serfaty, who works on expanding Jewish-Muslim dialogue, agrees.  Since the November attacks, a number of Muslim groups have been reaching out to him, he says.

    Coming together at Boucherie de l’Argonne

    Leontine Duobongo, from Congo-Brazzaville, hesitates over cuts at the meat counter.  Raised a Christian, she converted to Judaism a few years ago.

    The store’s kosher certification also draws many Muslim customers, Zribi says.  “Their biggest concern is for the meat to be properly drained of the blood,” he says of a custom also observed by Halal butchers, “and they know that’s the case here.”

    Meat is being prepared at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. (L. Bryant/VOA)
    Meat is being prepared at Boucherie de l'Argonne, in Paris, Feb. 3, 2016. (L. Bryant/VOA)


    A native of Tunisia, Zribi moved to Paris as a toddler in the 1960s, joining North African Jews leaving their homelands after independence.  In the 1980s, his father opened the butcher's shop that Zribi now runs with a brother.

    During lunch breaks, the butchers sometimes share meals.  The Zribi family has installed a prayer room for their Muslim employees.  Conversations are sprinkled with the Arabic from their homelands.

    Mustafa Makhoukh, a Muslim from Morocco, has been employed at the shop for 18 years, a job he said he got “by chance.”

    “We have good times and laughs,” he says. “It’s like a family.”

    “Working with Jews isn’t a problem,” says Muslim butcher Abdel Haq.

    “We lived with Jews in Morocco.  When it comes to religion, each person has his own convictions.”

    Last year’s terrorist attacks also draw the staff together.  The shootings and bombings were indiscriminate, killing a wide sampling of city residents.

    Butcher Zribi lost two Italian friends during the attacks.  Haq says he lost nobody, but remains shaken by the incident.

    “The only lesson I can offer is not to be afraid of the other person,” he says.  “If I find myself next to a Jew at a cafe, we’ll talk.  We have to go toward the other.”

    VOICE OF AMERICA, Lisa Bryant, 3 février 2016

  • A Paris butcher offers a lesson in interfaith ties

    PARIS — On Fridays, the Boucherie de l’Argonne closes early. Its Muslim workers head to afternoon prayers. The Jews prepare for Shabbat — a practical accommodation for staff sharing similar roots and cultural references.

    “We work well together,” says Philippe Zribi, a Tunisian-born Jew whose family runs the butcher’s store that employs eight people: three Jews, three Muslims and two Catholics.

    In a city still recovering from last year’s deadly extremist terror attacks, where national news is dotted with reports of anti-Semitism, the store tucked next to an abandoned railroad track offers a more positive face of interfaith relations.

    With an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 Jews living in the 19th arrondissement, the district is home to one of the largest Jewish neighborhoods in Europe, according to local Deputy Mayor Mahor Chiche. It also includes a sizable Muslim population that mostly hails from North and sub-Saharan Africa.

    “There’s a real mix, both socially and religiously,” says Chiche. “The older generation who lived together in Algeria, Tunisia or Morocco, they know each other. They speak Arabic, Hebrew and French. But the younger generation has a harder time getting to know each other. More work needs to be done there.”

    Across France, anti-Muslim acts tripled last year from 2014, to nearly 400, while anti-Jewish acts were double that number, according to Interior Ministry statistics.

    When a Kurdish teen attacked a Marseille Jewish teacher with a machete last month, some Jews opted to remove their yarmulkes and keep a low profile.

    “I remain pretty pessimistic,” says Sammy Ghozlan, who heads the National Bureau of Vigilance Against Anti-Semitism, a French watchdog group near Paris. Like many others, he blames the attacks on young Muslims and, to a lesser degree, the far right.

    Those incidents add to a broader, troubling picture of race and religion in France. A new IPSOS survey finds more than two-thirds of French Jews believe anti-Semitism has greatly increased over the past five years. More than one-quarter of all French surveyed said they had personally encountered insults and other problems with Muslims over the past year, according to the report commissioned by the French Judaism Foundation.

    The 19th has its own share of problems. The radicalized Muslim brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi, who gunned down a dozen people at the Charlie Hebdo magazine before dying in a hail of police gunfire, grew up in the district. They joined an extremist network known as the Buttes Chaumont gang, named after a neighborhood park about a mile from the Argonne butcher store.

    The gang was dismantled a decade ago, and Deputy Mayor Chiche says anti-Semitic acts have abated to about a dozen yearly.

    But some experts believe November’s Paris attacks have led to a greater understanding among mainstream Jews and Muslims.

    Rabbi Michel Serfaty, who heads a Jewish-Muslim friendship association, says Muslim groups are now reaching out to him. “This is new,” he says. “They’re saying they can’t continue living this way, with misunderstandings.”

    The Argonne butchery, where a photo of the late Lubavitcher Rabbi Menachem Schneerson is pasted near the cash register, offers another example of relations that work.

    A steady stream of customers arrives before closing time. Leontine Duobongo, from the Republic of the Congo, studies the cuts. Raised a Christian, she converted to Judaism a few years ago.

    “My boss is Jewish so I became Jewish,” she says.

    The store’s kosher certification also draws Muslims who keep similar halal dietary codes.

    A native of Sfax, in southern Tunisia, butcher Zribi moved to Paris as a toddler in the 1960s, his family joining the waves of North African Jews leaving their homelands after independence. In the 1980s, his father opened the store, which Zribi helps run with a brother.

    The Zribis have installed a prayer room for their Muslim employees. They sometimes lunch together. Conversations are sprinkled with the Arabic from their homelands.

    For butcher Mostafa Makhoukh, a Muslim from Oujda, Morocco, the Argonne store where he has worked for 18 years is now “family.”

    “Working with Jews isn’t a problem,” agrees another Muslim butcher, Abdel Haq, who also comes from Morocco. “When it comes to religion, each person has his own convictions,” he says.

    November’s indiscriminate assault on Paris nightspots has drawn Argonne’s staff closer together.

    Zribi lost two Italian friends. Haq, the Muslim butcher, says he lost nobody, but remains shaken by the killings.

    “The only lesson I can offer is not to be afraid of the other person,” he says. “If I find myself next to a Jew at a cafe, we’ll talk. We have to go toward the other.”

    Washington Post, By Elizabeth Bryant 4 février 2016

    Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Religion News Service LLC.

     

    “There’s a real mix, both socially and religiously,” says Chiche. “The older generation who lived together in Algeria, Tunisia or Morocco, they know each other. They speak Arabic, Hebrew and French. But the younger generation has a harder time getting to know each other. More work needs to be done there.”

    Across France, anti-Muslim acts tripled last year from 2014, to nearly 400, while anti-Jewish acts were double that number, according to Interior Ministry statistics.

    When a Kurdish teen attacked a Marseille Jewish teacher with a machete last month, some Jews opted to remove their yarmulkes and keep a low profile.

    “I remain pretty pessimistic,” says Sammy Ghozlan, who heads the National Bureau of Vigilance Against Anti-Semitism, a French watchdog group near Paris. Like many others, he blames the attacks on young Muslims and, to a lesser degree, the far right.

    Those incidents add to a broader, troubling picture of race and religion in France. A new IPSOS survey finds more than two-thirds of French Jews believe anti-Semitism has greatly increased over the past five years. More than one-quarter of all French surveyed said they had personally encountered insults and other problems with Muslims over the past year, according to the report commissioned by the French Judaism Foundation.

    The 19th has its own share of problems. The radicalized Muslim brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi, who gunned down a dozen people at the Charlie Hebdo magazine before dying in a hail of police gunfire, grew up in the district. They joined an extremist network known as the Buttes Chaumont gang, named after a neighborhood park about a mile from the Argonne butcher store.

    The gang was dismantled a decade ago, and Deputy Mayor Chiche says anti-Semitic acts have abated to about a dozen yearly.

    But some experts believe November’s Paris attacks have led to a greater understanding among mainstream Jews and Muslims.

    Rabbi Michel Serfaty, who heads a Jewish-Muslim friendship association, says Muslim groups are now reaching out to him. “This is new,” he says. “They’re saying they can’t continue living this way, with misunderstandings.”

    The Argonne butchery, where a photo of the late Lubavitcher Rabbi Menachem Schneerson is pasted near the cash register, offers another example of relations that work.

    A steady stream of customers arrives before closing time. Leontine Duobongo, from the Republic of the Congo, studies the cuts. Raised a Christian, she converted to Judaism a few years ago.

    “My boss is Jewish so I became Jewish,” she says.

    The store’s kosher certification also draws Muslims who keep similar halal dietary codes.

    A native of Sfax, in southern Tunisia, butcher Zribi moved to Paris as a toddler in the 1960s, his family joining the waves of North African Jews leaving their homelands after independence. In the 1980s, his father opened the store, which Zribi helps run with a brother.

    The Zribis have installed a prayer room for their Muslim employees. They sometimes lunch together. Conversations are sprinkled with the Arabic from their homelands.

    For butcher Mostafa Makhoukh, a Muslim from Oujda, Morocco, the Argonne store where he has worked for 18 years is now “family.”

    “Working with Jews isn’t a problem,” agrees another Muslim butcher, Abdel Haq, who also comes from Morocco. “When it comes to religion, each person has his own convictions,” he says.

    November’s indiscriminate assault on Paris nightspots has drawn Argonne’s staff closer together.

    Zribi lost two Italian friends. Haq, the Muslim butcher, says he lost nobody, but remains shaken by the killings.

    “The only lesson I can offer is not to be afraid of the other person,” he says. “If I find myself next to a Jew at a cafe, we’ll talk. We have to go toward the other.”

    Washington Post, By Elizabeth Bryant 4 février 2016

    Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Religion News Service LLC.

     

  • Législatives : De l’utilité du Front républicain

    La vague Bleue marine n’aura pas eu lieu, mais quelques circonscriptions de France peuvent permettre au Front National dirigé par Marine Lepen de faire « roi » certains candidats voir d’obtenir quelques Députés.

    En effet, malgré les tentatives du Modem et du Front de gauche et malgré notre mode de scrutin le Front National est aujourd’hui incontestablement devenue la troisième force politique de notre pays.

    Ce constat oblige tous les républicains à rénover la réflexion et les modes d’actions.

    1- La mutation du discours du FN

    Incontestablement, Marien Lepen tente depuis son arrivée à la tête du FN de rompre avec les calembours et les dérapages verbaux de son père qui permettaient de classer automatiquement sa formation dans les ornières de l’histoire du fascisme.

    Malgré sa participation au Bal de Vienne - un rassemblement interdit aux femmes et aux Juifs - à l’invitation du parti d'extrême droite FPÖ d’Heinz-Christian Strache et quelques candidatures nauséabondes ; elle a réussi aux yeux des médias et des électeurs à gommer le racisme congénital de sa formation politique. L’image policée du « Front National version MLP » marque des points.

    A l’évidence Marine Lepen a changé de discours, elle cible moins les immigrés et les questions de sécurité pour parler plus du danger islamique et de la « passoire » Europe. Elle surfe sur les craintes des français : remise en cause de la laïcité, perte d’autorité, perte de puissance économique… A HENIN-BEAUMONT, la chef du parti frontiste obtient 42,36 % et se retrouver au second tour face au socialiste Philippe Kemel. Jean Luc Mélenchon a fait progresser le score du Front de gauche (21,48%), mais n’a pas réussi à dépasser le candidat socialiste.

    Dans ce contexte, où Marien Lepen n’assume pas les propos de Jean Marie Lepen et où elle vise à faire une OPA idéologique sur les élus et les cadres de l’UMP, voir à former des alliances de circonstances le Front National devient un parti hautement plus dangereux. Une trentaine de triangulaires auront lieu dimanche prochain.

    En Europe, la tendance lourde est à l’apparition ou résurgence de forces politiques structurées autour de trois idées simples : la renégociation des traités européens et le retour à la souveraineté, la sortie de l’Euro (pour ceux qui l’ont adopté), ainsi que le refus de l’islamisation de l’Europe et la défense des valeurs chrétiennes.

    La victoire du NON au traité de Constitution européenne illustre la première victoire des souverainistes français et en particulier du Front National. Indubitablement, le NON de 2005 a participé à la dédiabolisation du FN puisque l’image du danger du plombier polonais a été partagée et que le résultat a démontré que les élites pro-européennes n’étaient pas ne phase avec le peuple Français. Fort de ce succès, le FN a fais de son hostilité à l’Europe fédérale le cœur de son programme.

    Marine Lepen fait ainsi le pari d’une recomposition de la droite nationale sur ses idées ; et au nom du redressement de la France la tentation de l’alliance sera puissante.

    Comme l’ont montré les prises de positions violentes contre le droit de vote des étrangers aux élections locales ou l’accueil des réfugiés tunisiens, les ponts sont d’ores et déjà faits avec, une partie de l’UMP, les élus du groupe de la droite populaire. La députée UMP du Tarn-et-Garonne, Brigitte Barèges, membre de la droite populaire, a ainsi d’ores et déjà repris à son compte la notion de préférence nationale.

    En plus de la « lepénisation des esprits », la course aux voix du FN de l’entre deux tours a fait des ravages idéologiques au sein de la droite républicaine. Droite populaire ou droite sociale, les candidats UMP ne savent plus quelle stratégie suivre face à la progression de Marine Lepen. Nadine Morano drague les électeurs frontistes, tandis qu’ Alain Juppé rappelle qu'aucun accord électoral ne peut exister entre l'UMP et le FN. Dans ce fiasco, la campagne de Nicolas Sarkozy a une responsabilité qu’il faudra que les leaders de l’UMP osent examiner avec sincérité.

    La lutte antiraciste des associations reste essentielle, et il faudra veiller à chaque outrance, à chaque dérapage à le mettre en exergue y compris devant les Tribunaux pour que le Pacte républicain soit respecté. Racisme, antisémitisme, xénophobie, incitation à la discrimination, délits de presse chaque infraction devra être relevée. Mais ce combat associatif ne saurait être suffisant.

    Les partis républicains à commencer par les deux principaux (PS et UMP) doivent se saisir de cet enjeu. Le Parti Socialiste aurait tort de vouloir déléguer la lutte contre l’extrême droite au seul Parti de Gauche. Marine Lepen et le FN seront vaincus lorsque les majorités politiques élues mèneront les réformes promises aux Français.

    La réflexion sur ce nouveau positionnement du FN et sur les remèdes prendra du temps, mais d’ici dimanche prochain le sursaut républicain doit gagner les deux camps.

    2- La nécessité de restaurer un cordon sanitaire autour du FN

    Pendant longtemps la France a électoralement contenu le succès du FN grâce au système de scrutin et au cordon sanitaire républicain et la vigilance de nombreuses organisations antiracistes.

    Si Nicolas Sarkozy n’a jamais été Pétain, Laval ou Franco, il a légitimé une partie du programme du FN en chassant sur ses terres. En effet, l’affaiblissement des digues entre droite et extrêmes droites a pu se remarquer dans le refus de l’ancien Premier Ministre François Fillon d’appeler lors des dernières cantonales à faire barrage au Front National. Seuls Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet, Gérard Larcher et quelques élus républicains de droite avaient alors osé contester la stratégie de Nicolas Sarkozy de refuser le front républicain.

    De ce précédant, c’est banalisé la rupture avec la pratique acceptée par le RPR de Jacques Chirac de désistement républicain réciproque en cas de triangulaire et de menace FN. Si des exceptions ont pu exister, le principe était intouchable. D’ailleurs, en 2002, les électeurs de gauche n’avaient pas hésité à voter Jacques Chirac pour faire barrage au Front National.

    L’efficacité du front républicain et l’absence de réciprocité a récemment conduit à des hésitations sur son application, voir à son rejet. Jusqu’à ses dernières déclarations, Martine Aubry ne s’y déclarait pas favorable.

    Avec la menace du FN dans une trentaine de triangulaires, et en particulier dans le Vaucluse, le Doubs, et le Gars et les Bouches du Rhône la question du désistement républicain se repose avec acuité. Si localement des alliances et refus de désistements peuvent exister, la règle nationale doit être sans ambigüité.

    Martine Aubry a ainsi déclaré ce dimanche 10 juin qu’elle appelait « au désistement républicain de manière claire, concernant l'UMP, partout où c'est nécessaire pour faire barrage au FN ». Répercussion immédiate ce matin, la candidate socialiste de la 3ème circonscription du Vaucluse Catherine Arkilovitch arrivée en troisième position derrière la FN Marion Maréchal-Le Pen (34,63%) et l’UMP Jean-Michel Ferrand (30,03%) s’est vu demandée par solférino avec force de se retirer.

    L’UMP refuse désormais la logique du front républicain au motif que le PS aurait pour allié le Front de gauche (qui ne vaudrait pas mieux…) ; l’UMP pourrait ainsi reconduire sa stratégie des dernières cantonales à savoir maintenir ses candidats en proposant comme stratégie le Ni-Ni (Ni FN, ni PS). D’autant que dans certaines circonscriptions, le retrait du candidat UMP pourrait paradoxalement renforcer les chances du candidat FN alors qu’en se maintenant le candidat socialiste pourrait l’emporter ; ainsi en est-il dans la 2e circonscription du Gard où Gilbert Collard arrive en tête avec 34,57%, tandis que la candidate socialiste Katy Guyot obtient 32,87% des voix et le Député sortant UMP Etienne Mourrut 23,89%.

    Le refus de tout front républicain constitue une attitude contraire à tout le travail antiraciste mené depuis des années car elle conduit de facto à renforcer l’idée que le Front National serait un parti comme un autre.

    A défaut de front républicain, aucune stratégie alternative n’est proposée. Sans doute que pour certains leaders politiques le 21 avril 2002 et la dangerosité du FN ou de ses futurs Députés sur le vivre ensemble semble avoir disparu. Sans doute font-ils le pari que « le pouvoir corrompt » et que les futurs élus frontistes se normaliseront et se diviseront comme en 1986.

    Ces triangulaires ou quadrangulaires risquent bien cependant de renforcer durablement la place du Front National dans le jeu politique français, le fait que le débat sur l’introduction d’une dose de proportionnelle ne se fasse plus avec le danger FN en arrière plan illustre cette évolution théorique.

    Eric Zemmour explique très bien qu’une fois débarrassé de son « corpus raciste », le FN pourrait apparaître fréquentable.

    Dans ce contexte, l’utilité du front républicain reste indéniable.

     

     

  • Juifs de France : n'ayez pas peur du changement et de la nouvelle France métissée

    La communauté juive de France a vécu de douloureux moments en cette année 2012 en particulier avec la mort de ses coreligionnaires lors de la tuerie de Toulouse. L’unité nationale apparue à ce moment là a réchauffé les cœurs, mais n’a pas réussi à effacer l’idée que le drame aurait pu être évité et que décidément être juif en France aujourd’hui n’est pas sans risque.

    Huit ans après la torture et l’assassinat d’Ilan Halimi les plaies de l’antisémitisme version deuxième Intifada importée ne se sont pas cicatrisées. Pire, la confiance dans les pouvoirs publics, dans leurs capacités et volonté à combattre l’antisémitisme verbal, écrit, ou physique n’est que relative. Si le diner du CRIF (Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France) a fait salle pleine avec la présence des deux principaux candidats en lice, la communauté juive traditionnelle et celle qui aspire à l’assimilation a peur.

    Les Juifs de France ont peur, peur pour leur avenir, peur pour leurs enfants. Religieux, traditionalistes, ou hors-communauté, de trop nombreux Juifs de France sont victimes d’insultes verbales, de « blagues » douteuses, et d’agressions physiques. Dans son rapport 2011, le « Service de protection de la communauté juive » a recensé 389 menaces et actes antisémites contre 466 en 2010 avec une prévalence des « propos, geste menaçant et démonstration injurieuse » (29% des faits) et des « inscriptions » injurieuses (26%).

    Le développement des écoles confessionnelles juives privées sont devenues les symboles manifestes de cette peur ; leur succès est avant tout lié à un repli communautaire et à la crainte de l’insécurité et de l’antisémitisme dans les écoles publiques.

    Cette communauté éprise par nature de doutes - sommes nous Juifs ? Français ? Juifs-Français ? Français-Juifs ? Citoyens ? - doute aujourd'hui d’elle même. La communauté juive est arrivée à la croisée des chemins : défense communautaire ou universalisme.

    Contrairement à certaines idées reçues la communauté juive « organisée » n’est pas un lobby elle n’en a ni la volonté ni les moyens, mais elle cherche un mode de relation apaisé avec les pouvoirs publics pouvant garantir à ses membres la liberté de culte et la tranquillité publique.

    Indéniablement, une partie des Juifs de France voyaient en Nicolas Sarkozy son sauveur et protecteur. Il les rassurait.

    Le Président Nicolas Sarkozy a reconnu la réalité de l’antisémitisme, eu des mots justes devant la douleur des parents, trouvé les moyens de protéger par des cars de CRS ou patrouilles de police les lieux de cultes et écoles juives et est apparu à leurs yeux comme un Chef d’Etat protecteur.

    Malgré son discours sur le refus de la repentance, Nicolas Sarkozy a donné à la Shoah et la résistance française une place dans son quinquennat. Il s’était personnellement impliqué dans la libération du soldat franco-israélien Guilad Shalit. Ces positionnements lui ont permis de conserver un côté séducteur auprès des Juifs de France. La reconnaissance par la France de la Palestine à l’UNESCO ne suffit pas à provoquer le désamour. Ces dernières années, l'antisémitisme a statistiquement reculé, mais le sentiment de ne plus être des citoyens à part entière de la nation française s'est développé.

    A contrario, l’alliance PS-VERTS joue le rôle de repoussoir pour de nombreux électeurs juifs. L’antisionisme affiché de certains élus VERTS, le soutien des appels aux boycotts des produits d’Israël inquiète. François Hollande Président pourra-t’il assurer le statu-quo en continuant à protéger les lieux de cultes et écoles juives, faire baisser l’antisémitisme, surtout a-t'-il compris les peurs qui sévissent au sein de la communauté juive ? J'entends des membres de la communauté juive s 'interroger : "en cas d’attaques de l’Iran par Israël la France échappera-t-elle, à des émeutes, à des pogroms antijuifs ?"

    Les Juifs de France se demandent toujours comment la France a pu en 1941 les abandonner en les contraignant à se faire recenser ? Les Juifs séfarades chassés du Maghreb après le départ du colonisateur s’inquiètent du métissage de la France et du développement de l’Islam et de l’islamisme.

    Surtout, les juifs de France n’ont pas oublié que sous le gouvernement Jospin un nouvel antisémitisme s’est banalisé et que le Ministre de l’Intérieur de l’époque Daniel Vaillant n’avait pas su les rassurer ni les protéger.

    Ces nouvelles craintes et le lissage du discours de Marine Lepen qui préfère stigmatiser le bouc émissaire « musulman » en lieu et place du « juif » explique que certains français de confessions juives aient pu voter ou vouloir voter Front National au premier tour de cette élection présidentielle.

    En Israël, 3% des électeurs français ont voté pour le Front National.

    Preuve de la banalisation du discours FN, le grand rabbin de France Gilles Bernheim s’est senti le devoir de rappeler durant la campagne électorale que « les valeurs de la France et du judaïsme sont incompatibles avec celles du Front National ».

    Il faut dire que si les déclarations du Président du CRIF Richard Prasquier publiées dans le journal israélien « Haaretz » sur ses craintes en cas de victoire de François Hollande à l'élection présidentielle d’« hausse des manifestations antisionistes » reflète les peurs de nombreux juifs de France, on pouvait attendre d’un leader communautaire qu’il cherche à rassurer en proposant des solutions plutôt qu’à surfer sur la vague en s’alignant sur le discours de la frange la plus dure de sa communauté.

    Ces peurs fantasmées pour certaines reposent sur l’expérience de la période du gouvernement Jospin et des répercussions de la seconde Intifada sur les « territoires perdus » de la République et sur la difficulté du quotidien pour certains juifs vivant dans les quartiers populaires.

    Paradoxalement, la communauté juive a aujourd’hui une peur supérieure à celle qu’elle a pu ressentir au lendemain de la tuerie de Toulouse. Nicolas Sarkozy défait, les juifs de France craignent une libération de la parole antisémite et une insuffisante protection du nouveau Chef de l’Etat.

     Avec la gauche et l'extrême gauche, les points d’achoppement sont nombreux.

    François Hollande Président sera-t-il capable de trouver de nouveaux moyens de combattre l’antisémitisme ? Les enfants juifs pourront-ils retourner étudier dans les écoles publiques ? L’affaire Dreyfus, la Shoah, pourront-ils être enseignés partout sur le territoire de France ? L’abattage rituel casher pourra-t-’il perdurer ?

    La politique de la France vis-à-vis du conflit du Proche orient et en particulier pour une solution à deux Etats garantissant la sécurité d’Israël sera-t-’ elle maintenue ou rééquilibrée.

    L’antisionisme affiché de certains responsables de gauche (Hessel, élus VERTS…) conduira-t’- il à une évolution de la politique de la France sur le boycott de produits israéliens ? Évidement, ces craintes sont infondées, mais elles existent car la confiance n’existe plus.

    Les images de drapeaux syriens, palestiniens, algériens, et de nombreuses autres nations ont cristallisé la suspicion des juifs de France ; la France multiculturelle serait née, la binationalité érigée en modèle et ces drapeaux refléteraient la domination du champ politique de gauche par les forces « pro-arabes » et antisionistes.

    Ces mêmes critiques ont refusé de voir le peuple de gauche dans sa diversité chanter en masse la Marseillaise (plus que l'Internationale), que les drapeaux français et européens étaient nombreux. Que contrairement à 2002, il y'avait énormément de mixité, d’intergénérationnel, de français de toutes origines et cultures, et que des femmes voilées pouvaient librement danser sur les chansons de la chanteuse israélienne Yaël Naïm. Surtout, ils ont refusé de constater que ce rassemblement n’a donné lieu à aucun incident et que l'esprit républicain était bien présent. La France métissée éclatait sa joie de ne plus être invisible, contestée, stigmatisée, et humiliée.  Nicolas Sarkozy n’avait pas compris que la nouvelle France forte est la France métissée.

    Définitivement, les juifs de France de droite et de gauche doutent de la République, ils se demandent si François Hollande Président réussira à rassembler les Français autour d’une République retrouvée et à les rassurer.

    La nomination de Vincent Peillon à l'éducation nationale et de Manuel Valls au Ministère de l'Intérieur devrait rassurer les français et plus particulièrement les juifs de France sur la détermination du gouvernement de Jean Marc Ayrault de refonder l'école publique et de protéger tous les citoyens de la République de la stigmatisation et de l'insécurité.